AT&T’s ‘It can Wait’ anti texting-while-driving campaign gets boost

Written by  //  May 15, 2013  //  In-Brief  //  No comments

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Members of the Cangrejeros basketball team make their pledge to the "It can wait" movement.

Members of the Cangrejeros basketball team make their pledge to the “It can wait” movement.

AT&T’s “It can Wait campaign to end texting and driving was significantly bolstered Tuesday by the commitment of several carriers, including Sprint and T-Mobile, as well as more than 200 other organizations to join the movement.

Their efforts will support a new national advertising campaign, a nationwide texting-while-driving simulator tour, retail presence in tens of thousands of stores, and outreach to millions of consumers with a special focus throughout the summer months between Memorial Day and Labor Day — known as the 100 Deadliest Days on the roads for teen drivers.

The 2013 campaign drive will culminate on Sept. 19, when efforts turn towards encouraging everyone to get out in their community and advocate involvement on behalf of the movement.

“Texting while driving is a deadly habit that makes you 23 times more likely to be involved in a crash,” said AT&T Chairman Randall Stephenson. “Awareness of the dangers of texting and driving has increased, but people are still doing it. With this expanded effort, we hope to change behavior. Together, we can help save lives.”

The campaign kicks off May 20, with AT&T, Verizon — one of the campaign’s stateside supporters — Sprint and T-Mobile bringing a multi-million dollar, co-branded advertising campaign to raise awareness of the dangers of texting and driving, and encouraging everyone to immediately take the pledge against it at www.itcanwait.com.

Texting while driving is an epidemic, and it’s not isolated to teen drivers. It affects adults as well. Six in 10 commuters said they never texted while driving three years ago, while nearly half of commuters admit to texting while driving, which is more than teens. Furthermore, 98 percent said sending a text or email while driving isn’t safe.

Beginning May 26 and continuing through the 100 Deadliest Days for Teen Drivers ending Sept. 3, “It Can Wait” advocates will contribute to a social media campaign delivering daily reasons why texting and driving can wait. The messages with pictures and personal accounts will be shared on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and ItCanWait.com.

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