‘Practical Techie:’ A logo or a face?

Written by  //  January 2, 2014  //  Biz Views  //  No comments

Author Rafael Matos is professor of multimedia at a private university and director of the Caribbean Multimedia Center, a nonprofit media lab focusing on closing the digital divide. Questions should be sent to cccrafael@gmail.com.

Author Rafael Matos is professor of multimedia at a private university and director of the Caribbean Multimedia Center, a nonprofit media lab focusing on closing the digital divide. Questions should be sent to cccrafael@gmail.com.

Dilemmas come in all forms and sizes when it comes to deciding how to push forward a brand in the environs of cyberspace.

One such issue is whether to use a logo or a human face when presenting your company’s content on the Web.

It all depends, experts say, on the type of digital venue being used.

In regular business sites, the logos must reign supreme. The logo should be placed on the focal point of a page, which in graphic arts design means the superior left quadrant. Also, the logo must have the biggest size typeface. No other content in the homepage, or any other throughout the website, shall be bigger in size and prominence than the logo.

Below the logo must be the site or navigation map. No website should ever require a page visitor to explore around all over the homepage to figure out where things are. The most frequent map design nowadays is the sections buttons aligned just below the logo.

In the prehistoric days of the Web, the navigation map buttons would flow down the left side of the homepage as dropdown menus. Recently some web designers have become really creative and have very dynamic, animated sites maps. But, for business sites, fancy is not practical.

Now, if an entrepreneur is using social media as a branding tool, then a face is mandatory. Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and the likes, are all human interaction venues on the Web. Connectivity and engagement with other humans are the principle dynamics.

The businessperson wanting to connect with other social media users must present their credentials to them in human form. A logo is a cold, and object-centric device. Human visage is much more effective; warm, discernible.

Once this is understood, the next major decision is which face will appear on the regular branding operations. It should be a regular face, much like the logic of news anchors. The phrase “he (or she) is the face of the network”, is not fortuitous. There is strong marketing reasoning behind having the same face open the newscast each evening.

The face an enterprise must decide on should be a designated spokesperson for the company; or the head of the company if that person is articulate and communicative; maybe, a hired talent.

If you’re a so-called “solopreneur,” the decision process is not mind-bending.

Because blogs, much the same as the other social media, are cybernetic venues to build relationships, the face behind your company’s messages will act as the prime engager. Thus, chose carefully.

The wisdom is that people connect with people, not with logos.

Not complicated. The mission is to build a functional social strategy for you biz, whether large or small. Logos serve well for webpages. On the other hand, faces work best for social engaging with company followers or potential adherents.

One last pointer on this. Strategy must always be open-ended. As the social media evolves on the Web, so must a business chief adjust its sites and tactics.

Also, as usual, always keep an eye out for what best works for you enterprise. The digital revolution is never still. So must our creativity also not rest.,

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