FeaturedGovernment

New executive order extends Puerto Rico’s lockdown, but makes exceptions

Puerto Rico Gov. Wanda Vázquez signed a new executive order establishing an extended lockdown and curfew period through April 12, escalating the fight to contain the local spread of the coronavirus COVID-19.

The new order, which goes into effect today, confirms who can be on the roads and when, and businesses that may partially open during the emergency.

“The measures we’re taking are to protect citizens from this virus. We have seen how in other countries the proper precautions have not been taken in time, and deaths are already in the thousands,” the governor said.

“To avoid this, the best way is to stay at home. However, if there’s a need for basic goods or services, we’re allowing some businesses to remain open, but always abiding by the security measures and respecting the schedules during which people will be able to transit on public roads,” she said.

Some of the new order’s highlights are:

  • A longer curfew for island residents, from 7 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. starting today.
  • Hospitals, labs, grocery stores, drugstores, gas stations, banks and restaurants offering drive-through, delivery or pick-up service will remain open as they have since the first executive order went into effect Mar. 15.
  • Also on the list of establishments allowed to open are senior care facilities and pawn shops only to accept pawned items and debt payment, not to sell merchandise.
  • A new measure included in the order calls for the closing of grocery stores on Sunday, as well as drugstores, except for prescription pick-up windows, and gas stations, except for the pumps.
  • A new system will go into effect April 1 to assign days for when people are allowed to be out on the road, according to the last number of their vehicle’s license plate: even numbers, including the zero, and letters are authorized to transit Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Odd numbers are allowed on the road Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
  • As an exception, plumbers, electricians, exterminators, and other services that are necessary to upkeep health, safety, and essential operation at the individual, residential, commercial, industrial, or public level may work, provided they offer a telephone number or e-mail to be contacted without the need to open a store, keeping in mind health, safety and hygiene aspects. This includes elevator and pool maintenance.
  • Likewise, roadside assistance and locksmith companies may operate, only to handle emergency cases, without opening establishments that receive the public. Package delivery and shipping companies may also operate, and telecom companies will be allowed to install, repair, and provide maintenance to critical infrastructure.
  • Nonprofits may offer services, under the established conditions.
  • Regarding funeral services, bodies may be collected or transferred, embalmed, cremated and buried, but public funerals are not allowed.
  • Auto parts and repair shops may open Wednesday and Thursday (9 a.m.-12 p.m.) by appointment only.
  • Hardware stores may also open Friday and Saturday (9 a.m.-12 p.m.) by appointment only, without opening to the general public.
  • Dental offices will remain closed, unless there’s an emergency.
  • The executive order includes a seven-hour window between 5 a.m. and 12 p.m. today, for a maximum of five employees per business responsible for processing payroll payments, to go to their offices to get checks out. Employees encouraged to work remotely will also be afforded the same exception to go to their workplace to pick up necessary materials and equipment.

“Beyond the circumstances described above, a citizen may only leave their residence due to an emergency situation, to work in one of the places allowed in this order, as long as they can prove it, or perform one of the services allowed in this order,” the governor said.

Violation of the provisions in the order carry penalties of up to six months in jail or of up to $5,000 or both, at the discretion of the court.

Author Details
Business reporter with 25 years of experience writing for weekly and daily newspapers, as well as trade publications in Puerto Rico. My list of former employers includes Caribbean Business, The San Juan Star, and the Puerto Rico Daily Sun, among others. My areas of expertise include telecommunications, technology, retail, agriculture, tourism, banking and most other areas of the economy.

Comments (2)

  1. Talking to other contractors like my self here in Puerto Rico about all this Corona virus going on.. and unfortunately we all agree. There will be many more weeks of lock down more so as it gets worse. Like many months of lock down. Especially when the mainland death rate sky rockets into the hundreds of thousands and places like Africa and south America goes into the millions dead. As far as going back to work… Welp unfortunately none of us see that happening till next year. I am 52 years old and have been doing heavy construction all my life with many years of welding. My lungs are in bad shape. So in the next few days I will make a coffin for my self with left over wood from previous jobs just in case. Then start making more as people see me make mine and ask for cheap $300. Coffins for there family as it gets worse. Contractor /Boat builder and soon the only way I see to make money anytime soon…Coffin maker.

    • You’re kidding, right? For most people, contracting COVID-19 seems to be a non-event or no different than a bad cold or flu. The real number of those infected is likely 10x higher than what you think they are, and the total number of deaths when all is said and done will be far lower.

      Of course, those with conditions such as yourself, will want to be extra diligent about their own protection, but this overreaction by the governments of the world is absurd. They’re acting as if this was some sort of flesh-eating disease that if left untreated turned people into zombies. If the next pandemic actually is that, nobody will take it seriously.

      The politicians are sacrificing the economy and your livelihood for the benefit of the most frail and weakest among us, all in the name of hoping to be reelected by appearing to “do something”. There’s a whole lot of “power grabbing” going on right now.

Leave a Reply to Juan Cancel reply